MAN OF LA MANCHA

by Dale Wasserman
music by Joe Darion
lyrics by Mitch Leigh
mainstage theater
DEC 1-24/2017

MAN OF LA MANCHA
by Dale Wasserman
music by Joe Darion    lyrics by Mitch Leigh
original production staged by Albert Marre
originally produced by Albert W. Selden and Hal James
directed by Antonio Ocampo-Guzman
music direction by David Reiffel     movement direction by Judith Chaffee

An energetic revival of the Tony-award winning musical, Man of La Mancha features Boston-area favorite Maurice Emmanuel Parent (The Gift Horse, Ragtime, Cabaret) as the eponymous knight errant, Don Quixote, on his quest to dream the impossible dream. Journey along with us and experience this classic musical adventure this holiday season.

 

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MAINSTAGE SEASON

Ideation   |   Oleanna   |   Man of La Mancha   |   The Bakelite Masterpiece    |    Two Jews Walk into a War…

STATEMENTS OF SURVIVAL SERIES
Unveiled   |   Statements after an Arrest under the Immorality Act    |   Lonely Planet   |   Ripe Frenzy 

Stefan Barner*

Prisoner 6 (Father Pérez)

Stefan Barner*

Prisoner 6 (Father Pérez)

Bio coming soon!

Shonna Cirone*

Prisoner 7 (María, the innkeeper’s wife)

Shonna Cirone*

Prisoner 7 (María, the innkeeper’s wife)

Bio coming soon!

Christina English

Prisoner 5 (Luisa, Quijana’s housekeeper

Christina English

Prisoner 5 (Luisa, Quijana’s housekeeper

Bio coming soon!

Ute Gfrerer

Prisoner 1 (Aldonza)

Ute Gfrerer

Prisoner 1 (Aldonza)

Having given her Amercian Theater debut with Virginia Opera in a production of the “Seven Deadly Sins” last season, Austrian soprano Ute Gfrerer is considered to be one of the best interpreters of Kurt Weill’s music.  She has sung and recorded many of his works, including The Threepenny OperaOne Touch of Venus, Lady in the DarkMarie Galante and The Seven Deadly Sins.

After studying voice and acting in Los Angeles she became a successful international soloist for the past three decades. Her career brought her to major musical centers around the world , including the Zurich Opera, the Vienna Volksoper, the Barbican Hall in London, the NHK Hall in Tokio, the Teatro National in Guatemala City, the Alte Oper Frankfurt, the Cologne Philharmonie and the Herkulessaal in Munich, working under the direction of Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Franz Welser-Moest, HK Gruber and Thomas Hengelbrock, to name just a few.

The artist’s extensive repertory ranges from opera (Susanna in Le Nozze di Figaro, Donna Elvira in Don Giovanni) to operetta (Adele in Die Fledermaus and Valencienne in The Merry Widow) musicals (Jesus Christ Superstar, My Fair Lady) as well as chansons and lieder. Ute Gfrerer is also know for her solo shows and cabaret programs where she channels stars like Marlene Dietrich or Edith Piaf.  For more info please visit her website under www.ute-gfrerer.com

Brandon Grimes*

Prisoner 11 (Paco), Monk

Brandon Grimes*

Prisoner 11 (Paco), Monk

Bio coming soon!

Nile Hawver*

Prisoner 8 (Pedro); Lead guitar

Nile Hawver*

Prisoner 8 (Pedro); Lead guitar

Bio coming soon!

Ricardo D. Holguín

Prisoner 13 (José); Guitar

Ricardo D. Holguín

Prisoner 13 (José); Guitar

Bio coming soon!

Paul James Lang*

Prisoner 9 (Barber), Captain of the Inquisition; Trumpet

Paul James Lang*

Prisoner 9 (Barber), Captain of the Inquisition; Trumpet

Bio coming soon!

Michael Levesque

Servant (Sancho Panza); Guitar, ukelele

Michael Levesque

Servant (Sancho Panza); Guitar, ukelele

Bio coming soon!

Cristhian Mancinas García

Prisoner 10 (Juan)

Cristhian Mancinas García

Prisoner 10 (Juan)

Bio coming soon!

Davron S. Monroe*

Prisoner 3 “Duke” (Simón Carrasco/Knight of Mirrors)

Davron S. Monroe*

Prisoner 3 “Duke” (Simón Carrasco/Knight of Mirrors)

Bio coming soon!

Maurice Emmanuel Parent*

Cervantes (Alonso Quijana “Don Quixote”)

Maurice Emmanuel Parent*

Cervantes (Alonso Quijana “Don Quixote”)

MAURICE EMMANUEL PARENT* returns to New Repertory Theatre after performing in The Gift Horse, The Snow Queen, Camelot, Rent, Passing Strange, Cabaret, The Wild Party, and Ragtime. Most recently he played the title character in Edward II with Actors’ Shakespeare Project where he is a resident acting company member and Co-Acting Artistic Director. Other credits include work with SpeakEasy Stage Company, Off the Grid Theatre, Underground Railway Theater, Commonwealth Shakespeare Company, Wheelock Family Theatre, Lyric Stage Company, Boston Theatre Works, Huntington Theatre Company, Cape Playhouse, and Barrington Stage. He received a 2016 IRNE Award for The Snow Queen (New Repertory Theatre), the 2015 IRNE Award for The Color Purple (SpeakEasy Stage Company), and 2008 Elliot Norton Award  for Some Men (SpeakEasy Stage Company), Angels in America (Boston Theatre Works), and The Wild Party (New Repertory Theatre). Maurice is an adjunct faculty member of Boston University and resides in Roxbury. Maurice will have the opportunity to play one of his dream roles, Don Quixote/Cervantes in Man of La Mancha at New Repertory Theatre in December 2017. mauriceparent.com

Ivy Ryan

Prisoner 4 (Antonia, Quijana’s niece)

Ivy Ryan

Prisoner 4 (Antonia, Quijana’s niece)

Bio coming soon!

Nicole vander Laan

Prisoner 12 (Tenorio), Monk; Guitar

Nicole vander Laan

Prisoner 12 (Tenorio), Monk; Guitar

Bio coming soon!

Todd Yard

Prisoner 2 “Governor” (Manuel, the innkeeper)

Todd Yard

Prisoner 2 “Governor” (Manuel, the innkeeper)

Bio coming soon!

Creative Team
Antonio Ocampo-Guzman, Director
Antonio Ocampo-Guzman

Director

Bio coming soon!

* member of Actors’ Equity Association, the union of professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States
◊ member of the Stage Directors and Choreographers Society
º member of United Scenic Artists, Local USA 829

News

An In-Depth Look at MAN OF LA MANCHA

Talkbacks

Sunday 12/10, 2pm
Sunday 12/17, 2pm
Thursday 12/14, 2pm

Adapting Don Quixote

Dale Wasserman’s Quest

How does one set out to adapt one of the most widely-read and highly-regarded classics of Western literature? Miguel de Cervantes’ novel, published in two parts between 1605 and 1615, is regarded as the first modern novel, and its author is frequently ranked alongside his contemporary William Shakespeare as one of the greatest writers in history.
Below is an excerpt from a 1997 interview with the show’s book writer, Dale Wasserman.
What attracted you about the figure of Don Quixote?
It happened by pure accident, actually. I was in Spain writing a movie when I read in a newspaper that I was there for the purpose of researching a dramatization of Don Quixote. That was a laughing matter because, like most people on earth, I had not read Don Quixote, but Spain seemed just the right place to repair that omission. So I waded into the novel and came out on the other side of a half-million words convinced that it could not be dramatized.
And why was that?
It’s simply that it covers too great a spectrum of possibilities. One could take a section of it, perhaps, but it’s a protean work. It is all things to all people and I thought it is a little like trying to pour a lake into a bucket. It’s simply too massive to compress.
And how did you proceed at that point?
I got interested in its author, Miguel de Cervantes. I ran across one fact which immediately attracted me and set up a possible affinity. That is, he was first and preeminently a man of the theater—he was a playwright, he was an actor, he was a man who went on the road with his shabby little performing troupe. He wrote thirty to forty plays, perhaps more, none of which were considered to be very good. But, in his love for the theater, his passion for it actually, he never really wavered. And this is what gave me the idea—write a play about Miguel de Cervantes, and blend or cross-fertilize his creation, Don Quixote with his own personality, his own life. Just possibly, then, one could have something approaching a dramatization.

The Impossible Dream

And the world will be better for this
That one man scorned and covered with scars
Still strove with his last ounce of courage
To fight the unbeatable foe, to reach the unreachable star!
Even if you’ve never seen Man of La Mancha, you’ve probably heard the song The Impossible Dream.
Recorded on the original Broadway cast album by Richard Kiley, the song has since been covered by countless artists, including Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, and Cher. Screen legend Christopher Lee even recorded a heavy metal version for his 2014 album Metal Knight!
What’s your favorite version of The Impossible Dream? Head over to our Facebook or Twitter to let us know!

The 1967 Red Sox

The song also holds a special meaning in Boston, thanks to its association with the 1967 Red Sox.

Having not played in a World Series since 1946, and having finished in second-to-last place the year before, the Red Sox’ historic journey to the American League pennant was dubbed The Impossible Dream by the Boston Globe, and the track was adopted as a theme song by both the team and its fans. Although the team ultimately lost to the Cardinals, the excitement built over that season reinvigorated Boston’s relationship with baseball.

“There’s never been anything like it,” sports photographer Frank O’Brien told The Boston Globe this year, in a feature commemorating the Impossible Dream season’s 50th anniversary. “Absolutely the most important year in the history of the Boston Red Sox.”